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labor

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Local Spotlight: Pin It Up Acupuncture with Hannah Wood Sykes

Sometimes you meet a new friend, share a deep love of Outlander, and you find out she has a really cool business! Meet Hannah of Pin It Up Acupuncture! 

Hannah is a local business owner, and mother of two. She's located in Sykesville, MD. 

Hannah is a local business owner, and mother of two. She's located in Sykesville, MD. 

How did you discover acupuncture?

I had a horse that was rearing. It was getting dangerous. I spent a year trying to figure out why and how to help him. I knew he was in pain but that was it.

A friend’s horse, that was a lunatic, was calm one day. I asked what she did, and her reply was Acupuncture. I snarfed at it, but I had tried everything else. We tried it for 6 weeks. In the middle of a New England winter. Horse was clipped and standing in cross ties. After the first needle his head dropped so low I had to pull off the ties. His head was between his knees, eyes closed, lip flapping open, and drooling by the end of it.

I figure that was not a placebo reaction and there must be something to this.

Fast forward to college, I’m planning to major in theoretical physics, but quickly figured out I would not want to work in a lab of any kind.

So I google practical application for quantum physics and acupuncture came up.

Further research and it seemed like the best of both worlds. Ground breaking research that has centuries behind it and so much to do to explain why it works; I would have a large variety of work to choose from as the field expands.

Plus it combined 2 things I liked to do: help people, and work with theoretical physics.

So now I’m licensed to treat people and animals and really enjoying it.


 

What benefits can you expect from an acupuncture session?

Acupuncture is really  phenomenal. Short answer is it does everything. More generalized answer is you will feel much calmer and serene after a treatment. You will be able to focus better and see things more clearly.

Acupuncture is just a tool used to remind your body how to be well. If there is a place where things are getting stuck, the acupuncturist will diagnosis through a series of tools we use, and the pins will go in to coax the body into its intended rhythm rather
than its upset one.

Stress can manifest itself as physical pain. Like migraines. Acupuncture will address the need for the energy, also called qi, to move, while I will help draw attention to things that could be causing the stress as well as ways to maintain your body post acupuncture.

How can acupuncture help during pregnancy? Labor?

Acupuncture is great for conception. So far I have 100% success rate for women wanting to get pregnant. And all of them had either been struggling with it or already doing alternative methods to conceive.

During pregnancy regular acupuncture treatments can ease morning sickness, back pain, knee pain and it can help with that strange mind fog that sets in.

Regular treatments can also help ease hormone spikes that can cause some crazy out bursts of emotions.

Acupuncture can also help turn a breech baby without being invasive. It’s all kind of amazing!

Pregnancy during labor was the best. I used 2mm long pins on adhesive tape and applied them to points used to induce labor. I had my water break early. We kept him in a few weeks longer, then on week 34 we planned to deliver. So I set myself up the night before, and when morning came I was 3cm dilated but 10am. He was out by 12:15 with only 15 minutes of that being active labor.

These pins also help to allow the sinews to stretch during birth and cause far less pain. I had him naturally, but he was also quite small

Where can we find you for a session?
I’m located at Coreworks in Columbia, as well as Merritt Athletic Club in Eldersburg. You can check our weekly schedule at https://www.pinitupacu.com/our-practice-keene

 I’m a member of Sykesville Wellness Group, and will be helping people to navigate to their needed wellness provider. You can find us at the Sykesville Farmers Market. 

You can follow Hannah on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PinITupAcupuncture/. 


 

 

 

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Using Water During Labor and Birth

          Humans have an integral relationship with the element of water.  It runs through our veins, we are born of it, and it is necessary for our survival. We are drawn to it for escape, adventure, release, and cleansing. As a woman is preparing to give birth, water is a means of release from the weight of her growing belly, and the means to ease her aching muscles. Water is a great coping tool in labor, whether through a shower or tub. (For the sake of this paper we will only be mentioning the use of a tub.) The use of water in labor can aide in pain management by increasing relaxation, decreasing strain on muscles, and creating freedom of movement.

 

         The mother’s ability to relax her muscles during labor can affect the length of labor and the intensity of contractions. The more a mother fights and tenses her muscles the worse contractions may feel. Especially in active labor, the mother may need as many coping strategies as possible. The birthing tub offers a great respite, and a simple way to relax. The birthing tub is often called, "The midwife’s epidural”, for its effectiveness (Drichta, Owen p. 257). The warmth of the water helps to ease the pain felt from contractions, relaxing muscles of the pelvic floor and back, and creates a mental space that creates privacy (Drichta p. 258). It is recommended to maintain water temperature at 96-98 degrees. Using higher temperatures could cause increased blood pressure, dehydration and lethargy (Drichta p. 258). The bath is also deeply engrained as a place of mental release in daily routines. Our bathtubs are typically places of retreat to relax, and the mental association during labor holds true.

 

          Labor is a physically demanding process. From hours of walking, lunging, squatting, intense contractions, and the possibility of little sleep can make for a grueling marathon on the mother’s muscles. The warmth of the tub eases both the pain of the contractions and the work of her remaining muscles (Drichta p. 257). Being in a large tub that covers her belly, the mother is buoyant and freed from the gravity of dry land. Her pelvic muscles are relaxed and her cervix will continue to dilate, often with more ease as she relaxes. A mother that is able to relax and mentally release her tension, will have an easier time laboring than a mother that is fighting each contraction.

 

        Being weightless allows the mom to assume positions that could be too taxing on land, such as deep squats using the side of the pool, that will help baby to descend and turn. She's able to easily move from one position to the next in response to her labor, while remaining warm and relaxed. The ease of movement allows the mother to find her own rhythm and coping responses that she would not have had if she was limited to a bed. Her ability to move through labor gives the mother more control and autonomy during the birth. She's able to push in the position that suits her, catch her own baby, and bring baby to chest without outside help or others manipulating her body. She has full confidence and control.

 

          Relaxation, decreased strain on muscles and freedom of movement are gained for the birthing mother with the use of water during labor. The three work together as a pain management strategy, addressing both mental and physical tension that could hinder a birth. The birthing tub is used at its greatest advantage during late stage active labor throughtransition. It is recommended that for every hour spent in the tub, the mother spends at least thirty minutes out of the tub. This is to ensure that contractions do not slow down, as can sometimes happen. Often contractions may just feel less intense, but are still actively working. According to Water BirthInternational, “Getting back in the water after thirty minutes will reactivate the chemical and hormonal process, including a sudden and often marked increase in oxytocin.” (Harper p. 2) As with other labors, hydration is of the utmost importance. Keep a drink with a straw nearby so the mother can drink at will. The birth can be completed in the water as well, depending on location (some hospitals only allow laboring in the tub) and as long as the labor is not having any complications (ex:meconium, shoulder dystocia).

           

 

                                                     Works Cited

Drichta, Jane E., CPM and Owen, Jodilyn, CPM. The Essential Homebirth Guide for Families Planning or Considering Birthing at Home. 2003. Simon and Schuster.

 

Harper, Barbara. "Guidelines for Safe Waterbirth.”Waterbirth International. p. 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQVM36r1rvw#action=share

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6KHW7TNiCk#action=share

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Birth Balls, Best thing ever

Birth balls, commonly recognized as exercise balls, have been used for many purposes over the last ten years, including physical therapy, abdominal exercise, and most recently to aid pregnancy and labor. Its shape and durability allow it to be used by a variety of weights and heights, and in multiple positions. Birth balls can aide in pregnancy and labor to improve fetal positioning, fetal descent and maternal comfort.

Fetal positioning can make a huge difference in how labor develops. A baby facing in the posterior position in the womb may have a slow descent, and can also cause painful back labor (Spinning Babies). Poor fetal position can also cause very slow dilation, often resulting in unnecessary interventions. In some cases, the baby may have a difficult time turning and become stuck, requiring surgery or forceps delivery (Spinning Babies). Fetal positioning can be improved by having good posture. Often pregnant women are sitting on cushy couches or less than ergonomic driver seats, causing poor posture (Spinning Babies). By sitting and resting on the ball, the posture is upright and forward leaning, engaging abdominal muscles while relaxing the pelvis area. The back is comforted and strengthened by ball use, supporting the pelvis. With proper alignment and a relaxed pelvic area, the baby will have room to position properly, and begin to drop into the pelvis (Spinning Babies). It also encourages the baby to settle into an anterior position that is optimal for labor (Spinning Babies). Often a posterior baby can be encouraged to turn during labor by sitting on the ball.

Fetal descent is defined as entrance of the presenting portion (usually the head) into the birth canal. Descending takes time and hard work from both mom and baby.The use of gravity and squatting positions are helpful in this process, but can be taxing on the mother’s muscles over a long labor. The birth ball is a great tool in this scenario, as it allows mom to sit in a squatting position, allowing the use of gravity and an open pelvis to bring the baby down, but also allows for rest. The mother can also lean forward while sitting, and receive a massage or counter pressure. The ball can also be hugged while deeply squatting on the floor. It allows mom a greater balance and ease in the position, one that can be utilized in the pushing stage.

The birth ball is a great comfort tool for mothers in labor. It allows the mother to rest while still engaging an open pelvis. The birth ball can be a great break from walking, while still remaining active (Birth Arts Handbook p.187). It allows the mother to do pelvic circles and rhythmic movements that help her ease the pain of contractions. These movements often help the baby to navigate the turns in the pelvis before crowning (Birth Arts International p.187).  The birth ball also creates a counter pressure against the perineum and buttocks that can ease the sensations of early transition, which can be a difficult time for the mother. Having the birth ball as a comfort tool the mother can find a coping mechanism and rhythm through her contractions. By having support and a rhythm to help her cope, the mother can navigate her labor and have a mental place to return to when labor gets hard.

By utilizing the versatility of the birth ball, a mother can improve fetal position, while encouraging fetal descent and increasing comfort during labor. By improving these aspects of birth, unnecessary intervention can be avoided, as well as the use for drugs. This can greatly improve outcomes for mothers and babies, especially in a hospital setting where the mother is out of her comfort zone.

Works Cited

Birth Arts International, Certified Doula Education Program. Demetria Clark. 2000-2015. P.187

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Hypnobirthing

With my second birth, I used hypnobirthing during my labor. You can read more about my birth story in the post below. I had heard a bit about hypnobirthing on some group forums, but was really introduced to it by a nurse I had during my hospital stay after the birth of my first daughter, Elena. The nurse and I were comparing notes on natural child birth, and she mentioned that she used hypnobirthing with her fifth baby.

"It was the most peaceful, painless birth. I'd think it was a crock if I hadn't done it myself."

Intriguing to say the least! Something that could make child birth painless without an epidural sounded amazing. So here's what I learned:

There are two schools of hypnobirthing; Hypnobabies and Mongan method hypnobirthing.  Instruction is typically done in a class with certified instructors, with subtle differences in what is taught. For instance, a Hypnobabies class may teach specific hypnosis techniques for analgesia/pain relief where hypnobirthing may teach guided meditations for deep relaxation (helping to avoid the tension that leads to pain). Either way, here is the point of hypnobirthing: release your mind of fear and tension, and your body will use its natural ability to birth without excess pain. The more you tense, the more you feel pain, and the longer your body takes to birth. By relaxing your mind and body, the cervix can open much more easily. We are mammals after all. If we feel fearful, our mind tells the body, "I can't birth here, it's not safe."

The best way to utilize the practice, is to do just that. Practice. It does take repetitive practice to train your mind and body to relax. In our busy lifestyles of constant running, it can be difficult to turn ourselves off. To go to a quiet place and just be still. The more you can do this, the more effective the tracks will be in aiding relaxation during labor. I visualized a quiet place that I stumbled upon on Pinterest. (I know. Pinterest is so good at that, great pieces to inspire labor and bathroom redecorating.)

This was my safe place during transition. Who wouldn't want to be here?

This was my safe place during transition. Who wouldn't want to be here?

 

 

 

I used this as my safe place when labor got hard, and I could retreat to somewhere else mentally.

 

So did hypnobirthing give me a pain free birth? No. I had labor pain like any other birthing mammal, but my mind and body were relaxed the whole time. I was wonderfully prepared for my birth, and didn't feel the same kind of pain I had with my first. I would describe it as intense, but I was able to cope. Sophia's birth was peaceful, and I can't wait to do it again.

 

Other perks of practicing hypnobirthing:

1)I slept amazingly well. I slept like a rock when I did the tracks right before bed. Goodbye insomnia!

2) I noticed a decrease in freaky pregnancy dreams. Could be a coincidence, but it's worth trying.

3) The tracks were a great break during a stressful day. I ended a recording feeling calm and focused. Something I needed when my three year old was losing her mind daily in the last weeks of my pregnancy.

4) Others have reported less anxiety and being able to better cope with anxiety using the techniques.

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