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Digging through the literature: Best New Baby Books (and available at your library!)

When I first thought about getting pregnant, I did what my nerd brain naturally gravitated toward: I went to the library and checked out a pile of books on every aspect of the topic.

Your local library can be a wealth of resources for your family. Plus, who doesn't love the smell of a good book?

Your local library can be a wealth of resources for your family. Plus, who doesn't love the smell of a good book?

 

I sifted through the old standby classics like What to Expect When You’re Expecting by Heidi Murkoff, some humorous ones like Belly Laughs by Jenny McCarthy or Girlfriends Guide to Pregnancy. Some I found really informative, others super dry, and a few became favorites.

 

As the years have passed, I was turned on to some great books by my doula while I was preparing for birth. Others I have come across during my training with Birth Arts International. I’m always dissecting birth and pregnancy books.

Is the language accessible and not just medical jargon? Is it up to date with evidence based practices? Which clients or friends will appreciate this particular book?

 

Know better, do better. 

Know better, do better. 

I’ve gathered my top 3 favorite birth and pregnancy books. The bonus: they are available for free at your local library! If it’s not available for some reason, ask your librarian. Often a book title can be requested from another library or they’ll purchase it for you. If you have a favorite birth book, consider donating a copy to your local library. It’s great to have a collection of birth literature available in your community.

1)The Mama Natural Week by Week Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth by Genevieve Howland

Written by YouTuber and natural parenting blogger,  Genevieve Howland, this comprehensive book covers all aspects of fertility, pregnancy, and birth. It covers all the options with prenatal testing, providers, birthing locations, etc. Having these options laid out is the definition of informed consent, and can help with decision making. It offers great natural options and nutrition options without seeming too far out there. (I can honestly say that on a personal level, I laugh when I see tofu in a pregnancy nutrition book. Not happening. Pass me that giant bowl of pasta please.) 

This is my favorite new pregnancy book. It's modern, it's accessible, and it gives a fresh take on birth. Have your support, know your options, and have the best birth you can that day. 

2) nurture: A Modern Guide to Pregnancy, Birth, Early Motherhood- and Trusting Yourself and Your Body by Erica Chidi Cohen. 

Author Erica Chidi Cohen brings a new voice to the pregnancy and birth literature choir. Writing from the perspective of a birth and postpartum doula, she brings a compassionate conversation to the reader instead of the usual lecture you feel like you're getting (eat right, get your finances and all the things done, be happy, etc.). 

The book takes a deep dive into the emotions surrounding pregnancy and birth, and offers beautifully realistic ways of handling them. She has a strong focus on self care and mindfulness that often gets overlooked. It hits the full spectrum of care that's needed for mamas and families right on the head. 

Best part of this book: more than a third of nurture is dedicated to postpartum care of mom. Postpartum care often gets the short end of the stick. The focus is on labor and newborn care, often not bringing attention to the fact that moms get put through the ringer with birth. Moms need more than just a primer on how to use a peri bottle and nursing. Cohen helps to plan your household, and gives tips for healing and bonding with baby without chaos, but with a lot more grace. 

3) The Whole 9 Months: A Week-by-Week Pregnancy Nutrition Guide with Recipes for a Healthy Start by Jennifer Lang, MD. 

If you were like me during pregnancy, you spent the first several months trying decide what would stay down, or at least not be brutal if it came back up. It's survival mode. This title tackles the nutrition behind feeling better during those early weeks, and how to eat for wellness for the remainder of your pregnancy. 

Lang breaks down what to look for in a prenatal vitamin, as well as eating to tackle pregnancy issues (hello constipation) and alternatives for crazy pregnancy cravings. 

The best part are the recipes included in the book. They're easy, delicious and healthy, and several can be made while having a screaming toddler at your feet. I love a realistic take on nutrition! 

What was your favorite book when you were preparing for pregnancy and birth? Share with us below! 

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5 Ways to Cope with Morning Sickness: because no one enjoys nausea

When I became pregnant with my first daughter, I knew right away. Food tasted weird, and my usual go-to meals would give me heart burn or make me sick. Orange juice was the worst. It was years before I could drink it again without a mental connection to vomiting.

 

I had brutal morning sickness for almost six months of that pregnancy. I lost fifteen pounds and needed to go on medication for a while to be able to keep anything down. It made me nervous for my baby and about my nutrition.

 

I learned a lot from that pregnancy, and was much more educated and prepared for my second. When you know better, you do better. And in this case, you throw up less. Here are my five tips for feeling better when you are dealing with morning sickness:

 

1)      Eat!

It may seem counter-intuitive, but eating high protein mini meals will help keep the nausea at bay. When your stomach is empty is when the nausea is at its worst and will reek havoc when you do have your next meal.

Eat little nibbles constantly. A scrambled egg and piece of toast. A few apple slices and nut butter. Crackers and hummus. Trail mix.

Eat small meals around the clock.

Eat small meals around the clock.

Anything combining protein with some carbs will keep you going, and your blood sugar stabilized. This includes nighttime. Keep snacks on your night stand, and eat when you wake up to use the bathroom or adjust pillows.

Sharing my own personal truth here: eat what sounds good. Odds are if you actually crave that item, it’ll stay down. Even if it's Sour Patch Kids and McDonald's French fries. Do the best you can, but at the end of the day you need your food to stay down.

 

2)      Sea bands

Available at any drug store, these are bracelets with a small bead that applies acupressure to a specific point on the wrist. Used mainly for motion sickness, it did help take the edge off my nausea. However, if you are waiting to announce your pregnancy these are a dead give away.

3)      Essential oils

Oils are neatly packed power houses of help. The two to focus on are lemon and peppermint. Just smelling both kinds of oils will stop the nausea. When I was out running errands I'd put a few drops of peppermint oil on to a tissue, and kept it at the ready in my coat pocket. Lemon essential oil can be placed on the back of the neck and collar bone, using a carrier oil like coconut or almond. For a better explanation of how essential oils can help, check out Young Living Essential Oils (https://www.youngliving.com). ,

(I'm not an affiliate, but I like their oils and find the website to be a nice resource.)

4)      Magnesium

There's a lot I can say about magnesium and all of its benefits, but I'll try to limit myself for the sake of this post. It's very easy to become deficient in magnesium, especially when you're having a hard time eating already. By increasing your magnesium, you'll sleep better, decrease muscle aches, improve digestion and decrease your overall nausea. You can take magnesium orally with supplements like Mag Calm, but what's way cool is you can also increase consumption transdermally!  So if your worried that a supplement may not go down well, you can receive benefits by soaking in an epsom salt bath or making a magnesium lotion like this one: http://dontwastethecrumbs.com/2016/12/magnesium-lotion/

 

5)      Ginger!

Candied ginger. Ginger ale. Ginger tea. Ginger snap cookies. Preggy Pops. However you want it, ginger is pretty well known for its ability to stabilize a rocky stomach. Keeping ginger snaps or ginger ale handy can also help when blood sugar is low, and nausea is at its worst.

 

If nothing is helping, don't hesitate to talk to your provider. In some cases medication is necessary. If you ever have questions regarding your health, supplements, etc. please contact your provider.

 

What helped you the most with morning sickness?

 

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