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baby wearing

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Baby Wearing: The Ins and Outs

When I was pregnant with my first baby, my doula and friend, Julie,  introduced me to baby wearing. She bought me a Boba as a shower gift, and let me borrow her Maya wrap. Baby wearing keeps your baby close to you, which is great for bonding, nursing, and generally surviving life with a baby. My babies would nap, nurse, enjoy the scenery as we walked the dog, and enjoy being, “held”, as I cleaned the house. Some days it was seriously how I managed to do anything!

 

I learned a lot about different carriers through the years, and through a lot of test runs have figured out what works for me and also for each individual child. Here's the skinny on each type of carrier, with some tips for each kind as well.

Ring sling: Made of large cloth swatches, secured with two metal, plastic, or bamboo rings.  These are great for fast in and out, and are great for hip carries. The only down side is you kind of feel like you need to keep a hand on baby, so you aren't totally hands free. It's much easier to use with an older baby that has head and neck control, but can still be used with a newborn. Slings have  a bit of a learning curve at first, and I needed help with getting started and fixing my sling when the fabric would get bunched.  

Ring Sling: Hip carries take the weight off of moms arms and core. 

Ring Sling: Hip carries take the weight off of moms arms and core. 

 

Soft structured carriers (Ergo, Boba, and Tula): Soft structured carriers (SSC) are generally easy to wear, adjust to almost all body types, and can be worn on the front or on the back as baby gets larger. These are great for baby naps, and allow your hands to be completely free. With a SSC you want to look for one with wide berth for hips; this prevents hip issues as baby grows and takes strain away from their back, unlike typical front facing carriers (bjorns). SSC can be used with newborns with special inserts depending on the brand. Ergo sells a newborn insert for their specific carrier, allowing it to be used from birth through toddler hood.

 

Soft wraps (Moby, K’tan): Best used during the early newborn weeks, wraps are soft and snuggly, and are great for naps, walks, etc. Your hands can be completely free, and with a little adjustment you can nurse while wrapped. It may take a few viewings on YouTube to get the wrapping right. A few styles of wrapping let you set up the wrap beforehand, so your wrap becomes an extra accessory. Bonus! The K’tan comes in different sizes. I'd suggest trying one out at your local natural baby store first.

 

Soft stretchy wraps work well up to 18 lbs, but are uncomfortable any heavier. Move onto a woven wrap or SSC after you're done with the Moby.

Moby Wrap: Front carries are cozy and can be pre-wrapped.

Moby Wrap: Front carries are cozy and can be pre-wrapped.

 

Woven wraps: These babies are the Cadillac of baby wearing. Super versatile, comfy for mom and baby. And. So. Beautiful! However, there's a catch. These wraps come with a hefty price tag, and there's a lot to learn about wrapping. My kids were always too wiggly and wanting up and down all the time for me to even be tempted to wrap. But by god, do I want one just because they are so stinking pretty!

Woven wrap: Lenny Lamb brand. Look how cool this is!

Woven wrap: Lenny Lamb brand. Look how cool this is!

 

 As with all the carriers, consider them an investment. They will last you through multiple children, and majority retain their resale value. If cost is prohibitive, buy used! (The straps will be soft and broken in.) Utilize your baby registry as well!

 

A few rules to remember when baby wearing:

1)      Chin is away from the chest. This ensures that the airway is open.

2)      Baby should be high enough that you can kiss the top of their head. Too low, baby could fall.

3)      Always keep buckles and straps done tightly. Wraps should always be secured with a double knot.

4)      Wait to wear baby on your back until they have good head and neck control.

Keep your babies close, and enjoy your carrier!

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A Postpartum Checklist: Planning Ahead for a Better Recovery

There's a thing about birth that other moms don't tell you about. Recovery can be hard. You're sore and possibly torn in your most sensitive spots, your organs are rearranging themselves after pregnancy, and odds are pretty good that you haven't had more than a few hours sleep at a time for days. Not to mention nursing, trying to maintain your household and take care of any older siblings too. This period can be really hard, and we don't always have family and friends around to help out.

Planning and preparing for post postpartum in the last months of pregnancy can make a huge difference in the time spent resting and healing versus stressing over the to do list.

Here are my favorite tips:

Food:

  • Stock your freezer with extra meals that can be thrown in the crock pot or oven. (Ask friends to set up a meal train or have people bring freezer meals as a part of your baby shower!)
  • Stock snacks that are shelf stable and nutritious. (Trail mix, protein bars, granola bars, muffins.) Bonus points if it can be eaten with one hand.
  • Bottles of water or good cups with straws for easy access during nursing. Keep them stashed around the house!

Healing items for mama:

  •  Rice bag or heating pad for after pains. (And its true what they say, after pains get stronger after each baby!)
  • Witch hazel (Add to your Peri bottle to soothe angry tissue and stitches. You can use to make your own cooling pads, or you can purchase Tucks.)
  • Lavender essential oil. Add to the Peri bottle when you rinse, and the oil will help to heal any tears and help prevent infection.
  • Aloe, straight from an aloe plant! Will help sooth stitches. (Can you tell I've dealt with some nasty tearing?)
  • A boppy  pillow or hemorrhoid ring, because sitting on your sore bottom can be torture. As often as you can, lay down. Nurse on your side lying down or reclined. If you need to sit up for visits, don't be afraid to keep them short.
  • Earth Mama Angel Baby has a great line of products, including Happy Bottom spray, Postpartum Bath Herbs, and nipple cream. I loved them with my second baby! The bottom spray was heaven on stitches, and  the bath herbs can pull double duty. Save the liquid for your Peri bottle and use the herbal pack as a warm or cold compress, or use as a typical sitz bath.
  •  Padsicles! Ice packs feel awesome in those first swollen days and a padsicle can help with both swelling and irritation. Check out this recipe here: http://just-making-noise.com/pregnancy-notes-soothing-postpartum-pads-recipe/
  • If you had your placenta encapsulated, break those babies out! They'll start to help with healing and replacing lost nutrients.
  • Have extra large granny panties, in dark colors, because leaks are bound to happen. I suggest having a larger size to accommodate the large pads and ice packs in the early days after birth.
  • Have super comfy jammies. I had no shame and bought extra large sweat pants. I just needed comfort and room to heal; I really didn't care about being cute. (I may still have some of these in my drawer. A girl has to hold on to some things for a Maryland winter.)

Nursing:

  • Have some nursing tanks on hand, but in my humble opinion hold off on buying nursing bras until baby is born and nursing is established. I was shocked by how much my breasts changed. We are talking three cup sizes! Wait and see what your milk does before you go to the trouble of buying bras.
  • Have a good breast pump and parts ready to roll. You don't want to be sterilizing parts while engorged. (Ask me how I know.) if you're using a pump from a previous baby, ask for new parts from your hospital. My lactation consultant gave me a bag with new tubing, flanges, etc. for free! This is also a good time to make sure bottles, nipples and pacifiers are cleaned and ready for use.
  • This is where all the food prep will come in handy! Eat and a drink a ton, more than you think you might need to. Your body is doing a lot of work in repairing and also making milk for baby.

For Baby:

  • Besides all the usual items for baby, I suggest having a carrier or wrap for those newborn days. I love the maya wrap or a ring sling to help keep them snuggled while you keep your hands free.
  • Sleeping arrangements for baby to be close by, whether in a co-sleeper, bassinet, or pack n play, keep baby in the room with you. Everyone will sleep easier.

For the home:

  • Netflix. If you don't have it already, do it. There will be days where you will be nursing the baby non-stop on the couch. Binge watch and rest!
  •  Set up baby station baskets around the house. Any where you'll be spending time with baby, but also in places like your bedroom. Include a change of clothes, diapers, wipes, easy open  snacks, bottle of water, breast pads, toy/book to entertain an older sibling, and a magazine or book for you. I often found myself, “stuck”, under a nursing and napping baby while starving and thirsty. Having these in reach made things very easy. I felt like I had anything I could need within easy reach, without having to go up and down stairs for items. I seriously just used whatever baskets I had on hand around the house.

What was helpful for your family in the weeks following birth?

 

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